My WordPress Blog Post Did Not Get Posted On Schedule….Again!

What the Heck!

You have crafted the perfect WordPress post to resonate with your ideal customer, scheduled the post to go out at 10:00 a.m. local time on a Tuesday (perhaps the most “perfect time” ever), announced the upcoming post on Twitter and Facebook, and then, 10:00 a.m. comes around, 10:05 a.m. comes around, 10:30 a.m. around, and still…NO POST HAS BEEN POSTED TO YOUR WORDPRESS BLOG. This is BAD.

People are going to your blog, only to see no new blog post. What is going on? What can be done? How can we prevent this from happening again? This post will expose the mystery of why this happens, and what you can do to ensure that your WordPress posts will be posted when you want them to be posted…ON-TIME.

One of the little known “fun-facts” about WordPress is that it really does not have a true “scheduling” engine.

In other words, WordPress does not have functionality that internally checks moment by moment as to ensure that your blog post has been posted at the time that you chose. What is depends on is visitors coming to your site, which triggers WordPress to check whether a scheduled blog post has been posted. If your site does not have a visitor come to your site, in this case at 10:00 a.m. on a Tuesday, voila…the blog post does not get posted.

What you need to do is to trick your blog into thinking that a visitor has come to your blog at 10:00 a.m. on a Tuesday.

Here is how we do that at O’Daniel Designs with our WordPress Blogs that are hosted on a Linux hosting plan with cPanel (I plan to post a “part II”, which will cover what to do if your WordPress blog is hosted on Windows). If you are not “technically-inclined”, no worries. You can pass this information onto your web designer/developer. They will thank you for it.

  1. Log-in to cPanel, scroll to the Advanced section, and double-click the Cron Jobs icon.
  2. Select Once Every Five Minutes(*/5****) from the Common Settings drop-down menu.
  3. Enter wget -q -O /dev/null “https://www.mywpblog.com” > /dev/null 2>&1 in the Command field (replacing “https://www.mywpblog.com” with your blog’s address).
  4. Click the Add New Cron Job button.

That should do it. Your blog posts will be now be posted within 5 minutes of its scheduled time.

If you have questions or comments about how to do this, just let me know, as I would be happy to help. Feel free to reach out to me at leon@odanieldesigns.com.

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Leon O'Daniel

Leon is an award-winning developer with over 20 years experience designing and developing web sites and web applications for companies of all sizes, ranging from Fortune 500 companies to very small, one person companies. He has an extensive background in web application development, technical writing, database design and adult education.

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